This Is our Village

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Friday, July 22, 2016

YOU ARE INVITED TO A FREE LUNCH

-
Dave Israel

Make America.......

An opinion piece from Canada.
Make America Fear Again! Make America Hate Again! Make America White Again! Make America Great Again!
America IS Great. Not Perfect but Great. A scandal free White House, the first in the last nine Presidents. An unemployment rate falling from 9,8% to 4% in the last eight years.
America is Great but Greater with fewer guns and more racial understanding.
The only thing that should be separated by color is laundry!

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Sunday, July 17, 2016

"POLICE LIVES MATTER"


AN OPINION PIECE

I am crushed by, and our nation mourns, the recent terrible shootings of our police.

Here's a suggestion. When you see a couple of police officers in a restaurant, or say a Dunkin' Donuts, walk over to their table and tell them what some of us tell our military service personnel: "Thank you for your service." If you can, pay for their meal, or even pay a part of it. You may be able to do this by speaking to the wait staff or the cashier. I wouldn't be surprised if even a "token" $20 bill given to a table of three officers would be appreciated.

I heard the other day about policemen who paid for the meal of a restaurant party who had asked to be seated away from the police. This is the time for us to render appreciation and kindnesses to the police.

The terror and violence of today seems to be contagious. Maybe if hundreds—even thousands of us across the country—show our appreciation for the police, that will become contagious. Is it too much to hope that even some of those "black lives who matter" (and they do) might thank the police in this way?—for the police, as we know, are daily protecting many, many of those of all nationalities, religions and races.

Demonstrated appreciation—not the big events, but thousands of such little touches—might be a key to changing today's atmosphere of resentment and hate on all sides. Contagion can operate in more than one direction.


PBSO 2016 SCHOOL SUPPLIES DRIVE - UCO COLLECTION POINT

-
Bring supplies to UCO Office
-
AUGUST 8, DEADLINE FOR CONTRIBUTIONS.
-
Dave Israel

Friday, July 15, 2016

FIRE SPRINKLER RETROFIT - PALM BEACH POST ARTICLE

-
Dave Israel
-

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

FIRE SPRINKLER RETROFIT - WHAT WOULD IT COST?

-
UCO has received a number of requests for approximate cost to retrofit the various Associations with Fire Sprinklers. Please read over the following article.
..............................................................................

Sprinkler System Advances Ease Retrofit


By Naomi Millán, Associate Editor July 2010 - Fire Safety   Article Use Policy
It's a reliable, long-lived, and proven technology. It's a fire and life safety system that makes common sense yet is not common in older buildings. "It," of course, is the fire sprinkler system. Even facilities built as recently as the 1960s probably were not required to install sprinkler systems during construction.
Which leaves large swaths of commercial real estate to weigh the potential benefits to life and property of retrofitting a fire sprinkler system against the immediate challenges such a project poses: physical barriers, disruptions to occupants and the upfront cash needed.
These challenges aren't the only reasons that facility managers push such deliberations to the bottom of the to-do list. "I don't think people understand the power of fire, how quickly it moves and its power of destruction," says Chris Jelenewicz, engineering program manager for the Society of Fire Protection Engineers. "When you're thinking about fire, think about how it's something that could ruin your whole business. Fire can change things in a moment's notice."
And if the unlikely happens and a facility is not properly protected, the facilities department will be the one to have to answer.

Advances in Sprinklers

Until the 1980s, fire sprinkler systems were viewed primarily as a means of property protection, says Tom Gardner, principal with The Protection Engineering Group. They were used in "high-cost" spaces such as supermarkets and furniture stores, he says, but with the advent of more sensitive sprinklers that could activate more quickly, they became an aspect of life safety.
Advances in fire sprinkler systems have eased some of the challenges of retrofit, says Ken Isman, vice president of engineering, National Fire Sprinkler Association. The availability of more flexible piping systems helps bring the pipes into the building more easily, whereas 30 years ago the only option was rigid steel pipes. And extended coverage sprinklers provide an efficient way to cover a larger space.
Still, says Garner, "there aren't very many volunteers for retrofit." The up front cost of installing a system means it has to vie for attention against all other capital improvement projects.
As a ballpark estimate, Isman says costs for a sprinkler system retrofit can run about $3 per square foot, or 50 percent above installation in new construction. But the actual cost depends on a lot of variables, says Gardner. He's seen it as low as $1 per square foot in a large warehouse that's out of operation to as high as $12 per square foot in an older building with a hard ceiling requiring asbestos abatement. Costs will tend to be higher in a smaller building or buildings that are very partitioned where there is a constant need to go through walls to install the system, Gardner says.

Sprinklers 101

When considering a fire sprinkler retrofit, it's good to start off versed in some of the basics. By far the most common sprinkler system is the wet-pipe system. This system is constantly charged and provides water immediately upon activation.
Three types of sprinkler systems are more specialized and therefore less commonly used:
  • Dry-pipe systems are used in unconditioned areas. Before water gets to a sprinkler head, the air in the pipe must first be bled off, leading to a brief delay in containment.
  • Deluge systems are for spaces with potential for especially aggressive or explosive fires.
  • Pre-action systems are dry-pipe systems that use detection (of smoke, for example) to tell a valve to open to send water to the sprinklers. Because smoke detection happens more quickly than heat detection, there is no delay in water being sprayed out of a sprinkler as compared to a wet-pipe system. These systems are used where water might be problematic, such as server rooms.
— Naomi Millán
........................................................................................................................
UCO Is attempting to obtain more specific data, relevant to our buildings.
Dave Israel
REF: http://www.facilitiesnet.com/firesafety/article/Sprinkler-System-Advances-Ease-Retrofit-Facilities-Management-Fire-Safety-Feature--11843

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Grieving

From Canada, we grieve for our American Friends. Most of all we grieve for America.

Friday, July 8, 2016

HOME CAREGIVERS NEED TO BE LICENSED

-

-
Dave Israel
-


Monday, July 4, 2016

SNAP SPECIALIST TO COME TO CV CLUBHOUSE

-
SNAP = Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (AKA Food Stamps)
-
Thanks to Commissioner Burdick, a SNAP Specialist will be at our Clubhouse on July 29, 2016.
-
See the following flyer, collect up your documents and if you qualify, mark your calendar, and call for appointment: (561) 355-2202
 
-

-
Dave Israel
-

Saturday, July 2, 2016

COMMENTS ARE STILL HERE, JUST "CLICK ON THE LINK"



Its seems some cave dwellers think comments have disappeared from this blog.  Not true.  If you "click on the link" hotlink you will see them.  I guess some self-important (and self-appointed)  people  were too busy "negotiating with the BBC" for a TV series at CV (what a crock) and "publishing" a crappy flyer filled with misinformation.

Friday, July 1, 2016

RESPONSE TO GARY OLMAN BLOG POST RE ATLANTIC BROADBAND

I see now that the fairly lengthy "Anonymous" comment addressed to me and in the first person—and therefore ostensibly by you, Gary—has been removed from your blog. Assuming logically it was by you, it seems that you have really changed your tune.

In your June 9 post you said (a direct quote): "I like it, Dave! I watched the Atlantic Cable presentation and I am happy to say that this is the best offer I have seen so far. Not that I know a lot about the Broadband business. I love the pricing, I like the products they offered and I like their attitude."

I thought to myself: What a breath of fresh air from Gary Olman. There is hope!

Then it seems Carole and Esther took you to task on your blog for your position in favor, and you respond, making this last stab at it with Esther on June 10: "NO, you are not correct. The presentation included an explanation that Wi-Fi(Internet) could be excluded. So without that I am looking at the total cost of TV and Telephone and this looks good. Yes the Company is a new one, but but it is backed by a Canadian Company. So we have to wait and see." Good for Gary, I thought.

Then on your blog what is next? There is a complete turnaround in your position without any admission of this! It makes one wonder who got to you.

You are mistaken in thinking the Broadband Committee had practically decided on Atlantic Broadband. Atlantic's proposal, to begin with, was only a "preliminary proposal." The negotiations are just what the word implies, a back-and-forth thing—not only with Atlantic Broadband but also in seeing what AT & T and Comcast might counter with. Perhaps they will sweeten the pot. You write (wrote, I should say, because yours is now deleted) as though the Committee had almost settled on one company. The negotiations have only begun!

As for our paying for the whole cost of Atlantic's bringing cable to the Village, Dave Israel's comment to my blog post on his blog clarifies this. Many others, benefitting from the branch lines, will be paying most of the freight. The point is still, however: The expenses to the telecommunications company, no matter who the company and who the customer, are front-end loaded, and thus there is sense to a lengthy contract to spread the expense over time. I'm surprised you and your "experts" don't seem to get this.

When you (and others) disparage those with technical expertise on the Broadband Committee, I find it impossible to take you seriously, and I think many others in the Village feel the same. You blithely suggest that we don't need CSI, with their expertise in negotiating with these communications giants, and that the Bid Committee might do. Thank you, I'll take the word of those I respect for their technical knowledge that an experienced intermediary IS needed. When my primary physician, skilled in general medical things, says I need the cardiologist, I trust his opinion as opposed to that of my neighbor who comments on about everything.

Finally, for your interest—for your deleted comment broached this subject—I don't make the call about who gets to post on Dave's blog, nor do I decide whose stuff goes in the Reporter. I'm sorry if you're "out," Gary. Sometimes there is a good reason behind such moves, though. You might give this some thought.

By the way and just for the record, Gary, I don't intend to "go back and forth" with you on this subject. You've said (and almost as if begging for it!) that you'd like that. Sorry, it's not in the cards. I am not interested in giving you and those others who are dissatisfied with everything a soapbox.


SECURITY COMMITTEE AND UCO REPORTER MEETINGS CANCELED

-
DUE TO RENOVATION WORK AT THE UCO OFFICE, THE MEETINGS OF THE SECURITY COMMITTEE AND THE UCO REPORTER COMMITTEE ARE CANCELLED.
-
DELEGATE ASSEMBLY TO MEET AS USUAL
-
-
Dave Israel
-


Tuesday, June 28, 2016

WHY A 10-YEAR BROADBAND CONTRACT?

A question I had hoped to address as a "P.S." in my "Why Broadband?" article in the July Reporter was why it may be difficult to negotiate a contract for less than ten years. Unfortunately, my "P.S." didn't quite make the publication deadline.

People point to the fact that ten years is a long time to be locked into an expensive telecommunications contract in this fast-moving communications age, and it is. But here's the difficulty, which those on the Broadband Committee understand: A large part of the reason the communications vendors want a long-term commitment is that they invest a lot of their resources (read: money) into the set-up of a system. In other words, their expenses are front-end loaded.

Take, for example, Atlantic Broadband's recent preliminary proposal. On the "front end" they would be paying to dig a trench to carry their fiber-optic cable in the ground a distance of about 60 miles—all the way from North Miami to here. Can you imagine what that will cost them for permits, engineering studies, negotiations, labor and materials? It's not exactly as though the construction would be taking place out in the hinterlands. To recoup their expenses and make a reasonable profit over, say, only three years would necessitate charging us an astronomical per-year amount. For OUR sake it pays to spread the initial cost out over several years.


Thursday, June 23, 2016

THE VALUE OF CV BROADBAND

-
Image result for Broadband icon

Benefits of Municipal Broadband Service

Andy Berke, the Mayor of Chattanooga (Tennessee) recently shared the benefits his city enjoys from municipal broadband services. The Tennessean reported:
"A pioneer in municipal broadband, Chattanooga developed its fiber network in 2010 with a combination of Federal funds and bond issues. The high-speed access led to direct and indirect economic gains and has been profitable."
Municipal broadband, a/k/a community broadband, is an affordable high-speed Internet Service Provider (ISP) built by the city, town, or municipality. It paid the cost to install fiber-optic cables to every home, not only to luxury buildings or select high-rise offices. A public-private partnership or third party may operate the network. Every resident and business that wants municipal broadband can sign up and easily get it; just like water, electricity, and gas services. Residents use municipal broadband for entertainment, education and online classes, remote work and tele-commuting, video conferencing, home-based businesses, new business startups, and more.
Mayor Berke listed the benefits Chattanooga enjoys:
"In the past three years, the city’s unemployment rate has dropped to 4.1 percent from 7.8 percent and the wage rate has also been climbing. Volkswagen’s presence has boosted the manufacturing sector and 10-gigabit speed internet has fueled wage growth, Berke said, speaking at Fiber to the Home Council Americas conference at Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center... “It changed our conceptions of who we are and what is possible,” Berke said... Downtown has doubled its residents and landlords often advertise gigabit speeds that are included in monthly rents... "
Other towns in Tennessee have installed municipal broadband services, including Tullahoma and Clarksville. How fast is 10 gigabits? It is the fastest service currently available.
The bottom line: 10-gigabits is a far, far faster than the 25-, 50-, or 100 MB broadband speed you're probably getting from your current Internet Service provider (ISP). Electric Power Board (EPB) provides the municipal broadband service in Chattanooga. Besides the blazing 10 gigabit speed, it also offers slower speeds.
......................................
If this can be done in Tennessee, why not here in Century Village. Improved property value, improved communication, putting Century Village on track to a new and improved future!

Thanks to Les Rivkin for reference to the article.
-
Dave Israel
-

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

joining the 21st Century @WPBCV

This is the only conclusion I could come up with that anyone in Century village would not want to join the 21st century... I imagine this is their thinking:


"Yep, it's time to start x-ploring outside the cave. Why, They's a whole new world out there!
They invented these little call boxes, kinda like our telephone but they ain't got no wires and there ain't no crank to get the operator to make your calls. They's call 'em cell phones,, and you can call anyone you want without yelling' too loud. Why they can hear ya clear across the county and you don't hafta even get yer voice all horse!
Why they even have these things that make noise kinda like the old victrola, but instead of the ol' 78's, they's are small silver disks and ain't got no grooves and make some really beautiful music and sometimes some awful noise they call rap or something. They got some of the same kinds disks that you put inside a box next to some new fangled TeeVee thing and they come out with them moving pictures. In color even! And them new fangled TeeVee's sure don't look like the TeeVee we had. Why they's more like going to the picture show at the old Bijou Theatre and almost as big!
They have a box on the desk with a TeeVee like thing and what looks like a typewriter but lays kinda flat and there ain't no place to roll up the paper into. They calls it a KEYboard. Tho' I ain't seen no keys, just a bunch of numbers and letters and some funny symbols and squiggly lines.
They even have that's smaller and fold in half and even one that you touch it with your finger and it does all kinds of things... They called that on a tablet... but I ain't seen no ten commandments on it so I ain't for sure how it could be's a tablet.
They said it work on something they's called a Why Fie. I don't know what a Why Fie is, but it must be something really small, cause I ain't never seen it. They's touch a bunch of letters on this here tablet and it come out with all sorts of information and stories and even some of them picture shows we saw on them new fangled TeeVees.
But I just don't know... All this new stuff out there and I ain't got no clue how to use them, so maybe I'll just go back in my cave and maybe they's just go away. "

NOTICE OF CENTURY VILLAGE MISSING PERSON

-
JEANETTE HAS BEEN FOUND AND IS SAFE!
-
June 21, 2016

For Immediate Release
Contact:      PBSO Dispatch 688-3400

Media Advisory

PBSO is Seeking the Public’s Assistance with Locating a
Missing/Endangered Adult
The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is looking for Jeanette Gennino.  Jeanette, DOB: 5/25/1925, walked away from her residence of 287 Chatham N, WPB, yesterday (6/20/16) at 4:00 pm, and has not been seen or heard from since.

Jeanette is 5’01”, 110 lbs., has brown hair and brown eyes.  Her clothing description is unknown.

Jeanette suffers from dementia.  She requires oxygen and uses a walker to get around.  She DOES NOT have her oxygen with her.
The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office detectives consider Jeanette Gennino to be a Missing Endangered Adult.

If anyone should come into contact with Jeanette Gennino they are urged to contact PBSO Dispatch at 688-3400 or the nearest law enforcement agency.

-
 
-
Dave Israel
-


Sunday, June 19, 2016

UCO MEETINGS - JULY 2016 - REVISION 3

-
Dave Israel
-

NOTICE TO MOVIE GOERS WHO TAKE THE BUS FROM CLUBHOUSE

-
Dave Israel
-

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF MEETINGS

-
Barbara Cornish
-

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

UCO OPEN MEETINGS - AUGUST 2016 - REVISED

-
Dave Israel

UCO OPEN MEETINGS - JULY 2016 - REVISED

-
Dave Israel

UCO OPEN MEETINGS - JUNE 2016 - REVISED

-
Dave Israel